Friday, 25 September 2015

5 misconceptions about writing

1. Writers have plenty of time to spare.

Those who write professionally will spend hours and hours in their day writing. But this doesn’t take into account the self-promotion. Many writers, particularly bloggers, spend an awful lot of time on social media. We have to promote ourselves to get people read what we have to say. Often the day can go by and you’ve been working all day – especially if you have another job, or go to school, college or university.

2. Writers earn lots of money – straight way

Unless you’re the genius that is J. K. Rowling, then you won’t become a billionaire through a career in writing. In fact, many writers have to get another job to keep themselves going as the royalties from their books and the small income that may come from blogging will not suffice. But we continue to write, because it’s like a calling. We have to write to keep our sense of mind.

3. Writing is relaxing

Believe me, I love writing and it’s my favourite thing in the world, but hell can it be stressful. I get so engrossed in the plotline, the happiness of my characters and the way they are feeling that I can honestly get really anxious by the whole thing.
4. Every single one of us is a huge nerd

Every writer I know or know of is, to some degree, a nerd. But we aren’t just nerds. We spend ages reading, researching and pursing our creativity. Writers are some of the most creative people you will ever meet and normally have some other creative outlet other than writing.  I am a writer and a violinist; I know writers who are singers, writers who are painters and artists and writers who have other interests that are quirky and fascinating. If us writers are anything, we are definitely not boring.

Credit

5. Writers have no social life


Probably the biggest writer stereotype is the image of a writer in their “natural habitat” of sorts. Alone, typing feverishly on constantly used computers. That may be true for a lot of the time but it doesn’t represent us completely. We have plenty of friends – the amount of time we spend reading turns us into better conversationalists. And where else do you expect us to get our inspiration from?